Sunday, August 28, 2016

Knitwear catch up

A jumper for my daughter.  
This jumper crops up on Pinterest from time to time, sometimes a jumper sometimes a jacket.  I thought it the most beautiful lace I'd seen in a long time and had to try it.
The pattern comes in one size (small) so I did some adjustments to get extra width.
We decided to go with the scoop hemline and I knitted to the armhole of the back and the bottom of the scoop came to just below daughter's waist which would mean the front, which was straight across would be somewhat higher, so back to drawing board.  Finished the back at the end of LAST winter, took one look at it and threw it aside carefully placed it back in the knitting bag.  I thought the shape was completely unworkable.  A trip to stay with daughter prompted me to take another look,  I knitted front and sleeves on  the knitting machine, did some stitching and pinning and tried it on her.  We both decided it looked pretty good but would be better with a longer scooped front hem to match the back.  Back home to the machine and now it is smashing.  
If you want to play this is where I printed the pattern from:
http://liuxiaoben1.blog.163.com/blog/static/5752898220139299424961/

And this is what I knitted from the replaced front, all except the hem and sleeves.
Another pattern from the internet, Little Miss Myra's Sweater, designed by Lara Simonson of Knot Enuf Knitting.  The pattern comes in sizes 3 months to 10 years.  This is knitted in size 4 years but about 2 inches longer in length.

You may recall this blanket from last year called Kea which I gave my grandson at Christmas time.  
In one stripe there were 10 threads of velour and with use through this winter they have riggled out to huge loops.
I've brought it home and replaced them with wool.  I tied a weavers knot and in stages of about 50 cm pulled the new threads through.  Its looking pretty good now.
The colours were very attractive and I'm reluctant to throw them out.
This has happened to me before using velour, even in crochet; it riggles and moves.  I don't know how other folks weave successful velour scarves etc.  Maybe the sett has to be a lot closer than normal.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Anawhata blankets Series #5

Anawhata Beach (photo from Trip Advisor)
Peaceful Anawhata Beach is located on Auckland's west coast, quiet because its less accessible with a 2 kilometre walk from the car park to the beach.  (Easy going down, not so much fun coming up again.)
This beach has a soft spot in my heart because 43 years ago my husband proposed to me there.

Warp threads dyed while chained.

Balls of fluffy mohair become skeins

and after the dye pot, three different greens.


Available at Pauanesia Store.

Sunday, August 7, 2016

Masala Ruana

I thought I'd reduce some of my stash by weaving yardage and create product for an event happening March next year.  This 4.6metre warp used 10 different yarns;  there is wool, mohair, ribbon, a gold lurex ribbon which looks elegant and a mohair that had fringed glitter in it.  This wove into the cloth and wasn't too in your face but after fulling the glitter popped up and looked like a Christmas tree so
over morning coffee, or two, I picked as many bits of glitter out as I could.  No way could I get them all but it now looks pretty good.
We used to call this garment a ruana but think it might now fall into the cape category.



Saturday, July 30, 2016

Jenny's Kingsize Kingfisher blanket

To my shame this large Kotare blanket was ordered a year ago but what with other commitments and travelling and summer (who needs mohair blankets in the heat) and knowing it would be a pig to alter the loom it just got neglected.
Sure hope it was worth the wait.

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Shibori scarf

You may remember away back I had the loom threaded for these kitchen towels


and these scarves.

Yes, one warp gets tied to the next and I got to thinking "why can't I make this work for shibori, both warp and weft resists.
And then Rene came home with a gorgeous scarf (and she might tell us who wove it) and I thought warp and weft resist but in blocks; so much fun!
It will be on display as part of the Creative Fibre Tauranga Exhibition opening at the Tauranga Racecourse on Friday 29 July.  And when I see it there I'll be able to tell you what I called it as I can't remember.

Friday, July 22, 2016

Rena Reflection

 Some time ago, probably a long time ago, I couldn't resist buying a skein of yarn from Anna Gratton Ltd simply because of the colour.
I wish I was a better photographer to be able to show all the nuances of colour but this pic of the threaded warp will give an idea.  Would love to know how Anna does it!  I manipulated the yarn in the warp to get the colours to stack and this shot below shows what resulted.
Woven warp faced to highlight the colour.  
Warp threaded on a 5 end extended twill.  
Weft a fine black rayon woven in a network twill which was unnecessary as it can't be seen but hey, had to turn the loom on anyway.
And the very wearable finished garment. 
This will be on display at the Creative Fibre Tauranga Exhibition next week.

Wednesday, July 6, 2016

Back in the day ...

Way back in the day when manufacturing happened in country and didn't happen off shore when I was a machine knitter before discovering weaving there was a knitwear manufacturer called Glengyle who had a sale of there surplus yarn once a year.  A lot of angora, from the rabbit that is, and I don't recall what else.

The first year I went with my son in his push chair, which makes it about 38 years ago, and was rather knocked sideways by these women on the mission of shopping for as much yarn as they could gather.  By the second year I had it sussed.  Son in care, paper clean sacs in hand and when the doors opened the game was to get as much yarn in the clean sacs as possible then go find a quiet corner and sort out what you wanted and discarded what you wouldn't use.  Oh I miss those times!

Anyway cones of this yarn have been boxed up and shifted from home to home and more has been added from sales and donations until recently I thought if I don't use it it should be dumped.  How could I dump it when it has been so loyal providing me with dreams of creation and coloured rainbows?  So ...


it has now become the softest yummiest blankets.
"Coast"  white wool warp and angora weft.
You would think that would make a dent in the "stash" but no, plenty left for more blankets.